Terminology Series #1: Acute vs. Chronic

Posted by on Apr 18, 2011 in Blog, Medical Conditions/Terminology Blog Series

Here is the first installment in the direct lender emergency loan Medical Conditions/Terminology Series: Acute vs. Chronic Acute conditions are severe and sudden in onset. The term can describe anything from a broken bone to an asthma attack.  Acute injuries often require immediate medical attention or first aid.   Acute Pain is pain that is an immediate onset and can be associated with a sudden/new injury or condition. A chronic condition, by contrast, is a long-developing syndrome, or one that simply develops slowly.  It is persistent or ongoing, such as osteoporosis or asthma.  Degenerative changes would be chronic.  Chronic conditions often are a result of overuse injuries. Chronic injuries often have mild, nagging/vague/subtle symptoms. For instance mild pain that is frequent or constant would be chronic in nature. However, chronic conditions can develop into a significant problem, which can lead to an acute secondary condition. A chronic impingement of the shoulder can precipitate a rotator cuff tear resulting in acute pain / symptoms. best place to get payday loan online Acute and chronic conditions are often seen together.  For example: Osteoporosis, a chronic condition, may cause or lead to a broken bone. The broken bone would be an acute condition. An acute asthma attack occurs in the midst of the chronic disease of asthma. Acute conditions, such as a first asthma attack, may lead to a chronic syndrome if untreated. Diabetes (chronic condition) can sometimes lead to or precipitate other chronic conditions such as heart disease, hypertension, or an acute condition such as a skin infection. Typical Injuries/conditions Acute knee injury Diabetes type 1 or 2 (Chronic) Chronic, degenerative changes Acute...

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Medical Conditions/Terminology Blog Series

Posted by on Apr 18, 2011 in Blog, Medical Conditions/Terminology Blog Series

Everything (including understanding) is relative Over the years I have fielded several requests from MKC clients who need help understanding medical terminology/conditions.   What is easily understood to a medical provider is usually not so simple to a non-medical or lay person – everything, including understanding, is relative. So beginning with this post, I will be sharing information topics that have been requested (currently and in past years) by MKC clients. The topics will be client driven.  It is my goal to not only help my clients, but also the reader of the blog post. This information request illustrates that there remains a clear need for ongoing learning and assistance to non-medical persons, even those persons who are involved with medical documentation on a daily basis; despite access to information on Internet. I recently had a seasoned client say to me- “I have to Google everything”.  [He was referring to medical terms and information.]  You may also be experiencing the same sort of things.  If so, you know that researching medical information/terms/conditions is hugely time consuming, and often frustrating for a non-medical person.   On a side note, not all information published online is accurate. When researching medical information make sure the source material is from a verifiable source.  Information presented in my blog will be from my own experience.  All sources used will be cited. I hope you will benefit from the information provided in this ongoing series!...

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The Michael Effect

Posted by on Apr 11, 2011 in Blog, Cancer, Golden Nuggets, Loss

A couple months ago, we lost our son, Michael to cancer. He was 21 years old.  The experience was painful beyond words. But, so much was learned during the experience; lessons about how to deal with the medical community, hospice services, managing stressful and disappointing information, and most importantly how we grew as individuals and a family. In addition to the obvious, we also learned wonderful things about Michael; things that friends and work colleagues shared with us after his death- things we often did not know.  I have come to call these golden nuggets- “the Michael Effect”.   I also think that they are worth sharing.  If nothing else then to help those who have lost a loved one, and to reinforce that there are golden nuggets in every experience and situation.  So here is the first installment of life lessons known as the Michael Effect. Michael had the exceptional gift of engaging everyone he met.  A family friend of ours explained “Michael just liked humanity.”  That was one of the truest statements anyone ever said about Michael.  Michael LOVED PEOPLE! He never knew a stranger, and just wanted to build relationships.  He took the time to meet and listen to everyone he encountered.  What a gift and a blessing!  I on the other hand am usually going full throttle and have not always stopped to smell the coffee.  A friend once called me “Hurricane Kari”.  Always busy.  Going or doing something. Sometimes missing the potential for new friendship or taking a few moments to call someone just to say hello. payments augustine real estatecontinuing credit crunch where But now things are different…I stop and visit with folks.   I make an effort to listen and engage with people.  This for me is the Michael Effect.  Just slowing down and being.  It’s nice.  No hurriedness.  No agenda. No purpose other than to be kind and thoughtful. Take a moment to just be. Get to know the people you are around. Say a kind word. Ask about their day or family.  Be positive and tender-hearted. And if you do, good things will happen to you professionally and personally....

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Proper Litigation/Claims Tools Are a Must

Posted by on Apr 4, 2011 in Blog, Claims Tools, Legal Nurse Consultant, Litigation Tools, LNC

When dealing with dollars and the bottom line, proper litigation/claims tools is a must -not a frill! LNC/medical reviews are critical to the proper management of a case.  Why?  You are not only obtaining invaluable information, but you are also sourcing a specific LNC function or duty. Adjusters, attorneys and paralegals alike wade through stacks of medical records, OR they will refer the case out to a pricey physician advisor. But is this the best way?  If you are not reviewing the medical records through the prism of a medical perspective how useful is it?  Or perhaps you are using a specialty physician advisor, but has that physician advisor looked at the records with a purposeful, broader view and gleaned additional, critical patient information? Either way you might not be spending your case dollars wisely. By using a LNC to review medical records and create a chronology, add medical/LNC comments to an existing paralegal generated chronology, or helping to steer your physician advisor, you are MAXIMIZING everyone’s time and money.  You are also gaining important insight from a wealth of nursing and LNC experiences. I once countered an attorney’s comment of “Kari, I can read a MRI report”, by replying “I understand that, but can you understand the report as a registered nurse or medical provider?”  I further elaborated and said “And more importantly how do the findings impact your case and casualty issues?  You need to look at the information with LNC glasses.”  He sent the records over and I was able to help by reviewing the records and creating an abbreviated LNC report. Don’t waste your valuable time! Use the resources out there to help analyze, create AND understand your medical...

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