Efficient & Affordable

Efficient & Affordable

We operate as a virtual company, delivering more value instead of spending our clients’ money on overhead.

More Competent

More Competent

A trained and experienced Legal Nurse Consultant will spot things in the medical record that claims adjuster will probably miss.

Seamless & Accessible

Seamless & Accessible

Our company is open 24/7. No matter what the issue or question, we respond to you quickly, accurately and confidently.

From The Blog

The Forever Battle

Reducing and preventing physician medication order entry errors Physician medication orders entered for the wrong patient is a constant battle for hospitals. At MKC Medical Management, as we investigate our client’s claims and cases, we see it all of the time. Many factors can lead to medication errors. In fact, the Institute for Safe Medication Practices has identified 10 key elements with the greatest influence on medication use and notes that weaknesses in these areas can lead to medication errors. They are: patient information drug information adequate communication drug packaging, labeling and nomenclature medication storage, stock, standardization and distribution drug device acquisition, use and monitoring environmental factors staff education and competency patient education quality processes and risk management Medication administration is a complex and multistep process that involves prescribing, transcribing, dispensing and administering drugs, as well as, monitoring patient response.  An error can happen at any step, but we see many errors happening in the beginning – at the prescribing stage.   Researchers tackle issue With the introduction of electronic medical records, there have been numerous studies focused on ways to reduce and prevent order entry errors. Researchers at Montefiore Hospital in New York, for instance, wanted to find a way to detect wrong-patient orders in their electronic medical records system. They devised a tool to track errors, such as prescribing medications for the wrong patient, and to suggest ways to reduce potentially life-threatening mistakes. The study lasted from December 2010 to June 2011. It found that two different interventions could decrease the number of wrong-patient orders that were later retracted. Phase 1 of Montefiore’s research: Physician Interviews Interviews with 233 physicians over a four-month period showed that 76 percent of the original orders had been for the wrong patients. They were near misses that could have turned into...

Tips, Trends and Findings

Here are studies, reports and stories that caught our eye in the last month. No “standard” claim: Isn’t one rear-end crash like every other rear-end crash? No, says an article in Property Casualty 360 that’s part of a six-part series about adjuster ethics. “Each claim is unique, the people involved are individuals, and each claim needs to be adjusted on its merits,” the article says. “When we try to do away with individualism in each loss, we either over-pay or under-pay, hence the claim is no longer ‘fair and equitable.’” Bodily injury claims: Claimants must prove both liability and damages to be entitled for compensation in bodily injury claims. But, says an article in Claims magazine, liability is often overlooked. “A good rule of thumb for all adjusters is to never underestimate the importance of liability as a critical element of the claims investigation,” the article says. “Beyond the potential accuracy improvement in indemnity payments, there is a dramatic rise in subrogation potential.” Cars could someday alert drivers to their own medical emergencies: Sudden cardiac events for drivers behind the wheel can turn into tragedies for not only the driver, but his passengers and others on the road. Toyota, along with a team of researchers at the University of Michigan, are exploring technology that could monitor a driver and predict if they are going to have a heart attack or other adverse cardiac event while driving, according to an article in Insurance Journal. The role of social media in personal injury claims: Defense attorneys are adding a new weapon in their arsenal as they fight personal injury claims: A plantiff’s social media accounts. “Many plaintiffs make things very easy for the defense, simply by posting things on social media that undermine their claims,” says an article in Forbes. “For...

Physician Peer Review or LNC Report?

What’s the best practice? Both When reviewing medical records, it may seem redundant and not at all cost effective to pay for both a physician’s peer review and a legal nurse consultant’s examination of the same claim or case. They both, however, offer unique perspectives. And, when you combine the two, the result affords you a more complete timeline of both the events that have happened and the medical future for the patient. The Physician Peer Review A physician peer review or medical review of a case can give you a pinpointed, detailed reporting of what has happened to date. It provides intricate details about specific pieces associated with the medical event and how those pieces fit directly together. More myopic in construction than an LNC report, the medical review yields very precise answers and insight into a medical event and the subsequent treatment strategies. Simply put, it’s a very accurate snapshot in time of the patient and the event. The LNC Report Also a major standard in the industry, an LNC takes the medical review and expands it. MKC nurses create a detailed medical record summary with ongoing embedded commentary, helping the reader understand both the material and its impact on the case. Contact us if you would like to see a sample report. An LNC report provides information about peripheral factors relevant to the case as well. It also considers long-term patient care and interaction, pre-accident medical information, specific information about the mechanism of injury and ongoing details pertinent to the injury and case. This broader approach often uncovers inconsistencies that may otherwise go undetected. An LNC’s granular level of review is equally important to the case as the focused review of the physician.  As one claims examiner once explained, “We know we will never have a...

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