Efficient & Affordable

Efficient & Affordable

We operate as a virtual company, delivering more value instead of spending our clients’ money on overhead.

More Competent

More Competent

A trained and experienced Legal Nurse Consultant will spot things in the medical record that claims adjuster will probably miss.

Seamless & Accessible

Seamless & Accessible

Our company is open 24/7. No matter what the issue or question, we respond to you quickly, accurately and confidently.

From The Blog

It’s not just physical

A primer on why we fall – and why everybody is at risk Editor’s note: Last week, we covered the importance of fully understanding the mechanism of injury and the resulting bodily injury that happens during a fall. Today, we cover why people fall and how it’s not just because of missteps or slippery surfaces.  This is the second installment of three installments. It’s easy to understand why construction workers or retail workers, who are working in unsafe environments or are constantly on their feet, are more likely to fall than other workers. Seniors also are at risk because they may have lower body weakness; vision problems; foot pain; or use medicines that could make them less sure-footed. But science – and experience – shows us that just about anybody can be prone to a fall for all kinds of reasons – wet flooring, uneven sidewalks or improper footwear. For most of us, walking is something we do without much thought. In reality, the simple step of putting one foot in front of the other requires a complex partnership between our muscles and our central nervous system. Regarding slips and falls, a 2013 report in the Encyclopedia of Forensic Sciences shows that there are two important phases to consider: Soon after the heel meets the ground and when the front part of the shoe or foot is touching the ground. And there are plenty of factors that impact our stability. The farther apart our feet are as we stand, for instance, the more stability we have. And our center of gravity as compared to that base of support or, foot spread, also is critical. An article on HumanKinetics.com summed it up this way: “High stability (low mobility) is characterized by a large base of support, a low center of...

Slips, Falls, Tumbles

Why there is always more to the story when assessing fall-related claims, cases Editor’s note: This is the first in the three-part series on evaluating fall-related claims and cases. A misstep. A wobble. And, then, bam. In a millisecond, a trip, slip or fall can lead to life-changing injuries, along with bulging medical files, an insurance claim and, often, a court case. Indeed, the business behind fall-related insurance claims and court cases is big. At home, at businesses and at work, falls cause thousands of injuries and hundreds of deaths each year, leading to billions of dollars in workers’ compensation costs and medical claims. Here at MKC Medical Management, attorneys and insurance adjustors regularly hire us to review and advise on cases that involve a fall. In fact, our practice has reviewed hundreds of claims involving various kinds of falls during the past 20-plus years. We aren’t biomechanical engineers. But, as legal nurse consultants and clinicians, we have a fundamental understanding of fall mechanics. Claim strategies are often based on understanding the mechanism of injury and the resulting bodily injury. Without that expertise, you risk missing out on critical details of a case and have less control over its final outcome. Always more to the story Environmental hazards – icy sidewalks, uneven curbs, bumpy pathways – typically drive personal injury and property casualty claims. But, for insurance adjusters and attorneys, when it comes to determining what caused a fall injury, there’s always more to the story than the weather report and emergency department records. The challenge when evaluating most falls is determining the validity of the allegation: Was it really the rain-soaked tiles that caused the fall or could there be another reason – the claimant’s high heels or a chronic illness that makes the person unsteady on their...

Is a nurse case manager the plaintiff’s friend?

Why the answer may surprise you   Your client recently suffered greatly from an injury and is seeking what he feels represents adequate compensation so he can recover and return to the workplace – if returning to work is possible. Then you learn that the insurance company has engaged the services of a field nurse case manager to actively work the case. Immediately, you assume that they plan to severely limit your client’s compensation – the compensation they are owed – or, even, may begin to push for a return to work. In your mind, the list of drawbacks can go on and on. Bottom line, you may think that the hiring of a nurse case manager by an employer or payor is not a good sign and poses a direct threat to your case. Right? Well, not exactly. Don’t fall prey to flawed assumption Yes, plaintiff attorneys commonly assume that the influence of an authoritative nurse case manager can only spell trouble for the plaintiff’s case. But don’t fall prey to this flawed assumption. An experienced nurse case manager with high integrity can be just as much of an asset, if not more, for the plaintiff as she is for the defendant. Examine this assumption by considering the true objective of the nurse case manager: They are tasked with guiding a collaborative process of assessment, planning, facilitation and advocacy for options and services to meet an individual’s health needs through communication and available resources to promote quality cost-effective outcomes, according to the Case Management Society of America. The professional nurse case manager should focus on the best treatments available, helping to move and navigate the injured worker through various diagnostics; physicians and providers; treatments; rehab; and, eventually, a return to work, if and when appropriate. Insisting on best...

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