Efficient & Affordable

Efficient & Affordable

We operate as a virtual company, delivering more value instead of spending our clients’ money on overhead.

More Competent

More Competent

A trained and experienced Legal Nurse Consultant will spot things in the medical record that claims adjuster will probably miss.

Seamless & Accessible

Seamless & Accessible

Our company is open 24/7. No matter what the issue or question, we respond to you quickly, accurately and confidently.

From The Blog

Tips, Trends & Findings

Here are studies, reports and stories that caught our eye in the last month. Return to Work: The workers’ compensation industry must focus on encouraging a timely return to work, helping employers keep a trained workforce and improving the quality of life and financial stability for people who are injured on the job, agreed most industry leaders at the third National Conversation on the Future of Workers’ Compensation. These “foundational principles” for workers’ compensation are critical as the industry faces criticism from the U.S. Department of Labor and OSHA. Medical Fee Schedule Recommendations: The Workers Compensation Research Institute recently released a new study to help policymakers adopt, reform or update the medical fee schedule in their state workers’ compensation system. Designing Workers’ Compensation Medical Fee Schedules 2016 shows how 43 states with workers’ compensation physician fee schedules and the District of Columbia made fee schedule design decisions, which have become the focus of policy debates. Opioids and Dialysis: A presentation during American Society of Nephrology’s Kidney Week linked opioid prescription with a higher mortality risk for dialysis patients. Those patients also were at a higher risk of discontinuing dialysis and hospitalization. More Marijuana?: Now that weed is legalized in California, an article in the Insurance Journal explores the question of whether the new law will increase demand for it from injured workers. The insurance industry is encouraged to start thinking ahead. Use or Abuse: Doctors are on the frontlines of the war against opioid addiction, but working as one of these “medical gatekeepers” is becoming more and more complicated. Steven Reidbord, a psychiatrist, covers the topic on MedPage Today. For more great information and topics, check out our blog on MKC Medical...

7 tips for hiring a great LNC

I’ve worked with a lot of legal nurse consultants since launching MKC Medical Management in 1997. And, from experience, I know what qualities make for the best ones. This fall, I had the chance to dive deep into that topic as I wrote a piece about how to hire a great LNC. For more information, see my article in Attorney at Law Magazine. Here are seven tips for hiring a great LNC: Know what you want: Have specific goals in mind and make sure the LNC meets them. Find out if somebody else will review the final product before it’s sent to you. Ensure the LNC understands the case: The LNC must understand not only who is at fault, but the standard of care and any other relevant legal issues. Expect a translation of medical terms: If the reader has to use Google or a medical dictionary to get through the report, then the LNC has failed. Demand attention to detail: If the LNC repeatedly misspells words, gets dates wrongs and makes other mistakes, then you need to question whether she has what it takes to be a consultant. Make sure medical information is properly reported: The LNC’s analysis should demonstrate a knowledge of the disputed facts versus the undisputed facts, along with any expert opinions. Any information that speaks to your specific issue or questions should be included. Look for a basic understanding of biomechanics: Nurses are not biomechanical engineers, but they need to have an understanding of how an accident affects the body. Meet in person or by telephone:  An LNC must be able to think like the opposing counsel and determine why a provider did what they did. A lot of information about the nurse’s skills and expertise can be gleaned from talking through issues in...

Tips, Trends & Findings

 Here are studies, reports and stories that caught our eye in the last month. Medical marijuana and the workplace: An article in WC Workers’ Compensation magazine covers the clinical and legislative significance of medical marijuana. As more states approve the use of medical marijuana, employers must consider how to handle claims when medical marijuana is prescribed for work-related injuries and policies related to work duties for those using  medical marijuana, the article says. Liability Medicare Set-Asides on the horizon: An article in Claims Management says that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services could review Liability Medicare Set-Asides. The article updates the latest movement on the issue and recommends current best practices for liability claims with Medicare beneficiaries. New study on Alzheimer’s disease: In a report from JAMA Psychiatry, higher brain amyloid burden, an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease, was associated with more frequent feelings of isolation, being left out and lacking companionship. These feelings could be associated with early brain changes in preclinical Alzheimer’s disease before the onset of mild cognitive impairment. Help for those healing: As many as 70 percent of patients with cancer report increased anxiety, depression, fatigue and a poorer quality of life after chemotherapy. A study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology found improvements when patients took part in a web-based cognitive rehabilitation program. Kids at risk: An analysis in JAMA Pediatrics found that pediatric hospitalizations for opioid poisonings increased almost two-fold from 1997 to 2012. Older adolescents had the highest hospitalization rates, but the largest percentage increase was among toddlers and preschoolers. Public health interventions, policy initiatives and consumer-product regulations are required to curb children’s exposure and misuse of the...

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