Efficient & Affordable

Efficient & Affordable

We operate as a virtual company, delivering more value instead of spending our clients’ money on overhead.

More Competent

More Competent

A trained and experienced Legal Nurse Consultant will spot things in the medical record that claims adjuster will probably miss.

Seamless & Accessible

Seamless & Accessible

Our company is open 24/7. No matter what the issue or question, we respond to you quickly, accurately and confidently.

From The Blog

You don’t know what you don’t know.

By Kari Williamson There is no truer axiom. It applies to virtually every aspect of life.  If you are unaware of a situation or unsure about information, then you are unable to fully analyze or even completely question the issues at hand. This is doubly true when reviewing medical records.  If you don’t know to look for something or you don’t know what to look for, how will you find it?  Blind luck?  Maybe you will get lucky enough to find part of the information. But, now what? Do you know what to do with the nugget of information you just stumble upon?  Are there secondary or tertiary pieces of information that affect your newly found nugget? In reality you may never know. THE Question Can non-medical readers “find” things in the records?  Of course they can.  Can non-medical personnel review a medical document? Again, of course.  It happens every day. But the bigger question is, do they understand what they have found?  And, even more important, how do you use it to build a solid case? Do you understand that perhaps you have only partial information? Or does that nugget lead to a HUGE vein of information?  Are you really clear on what to do?  How do you find other tidbits that you can build on? Some tips Here are half dozen best practices based on my training and experience: Look for consistencies and inconsistencies within the record.  Follow information reported in the history, physical exam and radiological studies through the record.  See if it holds up.  Or, does the information change or morph into something else? Dig into pre-morbidities and pre-existing conditions.  How do they play into the scenario? Look at the event timeline carefully.  I mean really carefully. Look at dates, times, providers names. Are there...

Mechanism of Injury (MOI) and its Role in the World of the LNC

By Danny Marshall RN, EMT-P, CLNC A definition of a mechanism of injury: Describes a particular set of circumstances that caused a given injury. An example: The mechanism of an injury from a car crash will often be described in terms of the speed, angle, and direction of the crash. Emergency medical professionals often take into consideration when assessing and describing the circumstances and causes of an injury. Pretty straight forward, you would think? Not so. As a paramedic I can think of several times I would bring in a patient involved in a motor vehicle accident and describe to the receiving medical team: The type of impact The speed at which the impact occurred The amount of  intrusion into the vehicle If the patient was restrained or not. Only to have the receiving staff not appreciate the importance of the information concerning the mechanism of injury presented to them. These descriptions are of paramount importance in ensuring proper patient care. To ignore these facts could lead to a negative outcome for the patient. So what does all this mean in the world of the LNC? In one simple word, EVERYTHING. The mechanism of injury is the heart and soul for a LNC reviewing medical records for a client. As a paramedic I would always ask what type of injury should I suspect in a patient depending on the type of event that occurred. As a LNC I am asking very similar questions as I review a medical record. Does the type of injury the claimant reports match the mechanism of injury. An example: a person has a slip and fall at a local business and now states a torn rotator cuff was the result of this particular fall. I am now asking similar questions:   How far did...

Being the Pupil….

By Laura B. Duhamel, RN BSN, CLNC My first blog was about the role of the nurse as a teacher.  The other side of that coin is the nurse as a pupil. As a nurse, my teachers include patients (and their families), colleagues, doctors, attorneys and other nurses.  While a new Legal Nurse Consultant may have years of bedside experience, learning to apply that knowledge in the legal arena has a learning curve that needs teachers and mentors.  The more seasoned LNC can also learn and gain a different perspective from a new nurse and their fresh eyes. It’s important to acknowledge that the teacher/pupil relationship is always evolving.  It also helps to keep it positive.  We teach ourselves through the research we do in the role of a LNC as we help our clients understand the medical issues in their cases. No one knows everything, and even things that are “concrete” can change. Who would have thought that the ABC’s of CPR would have changed? It is all about circulation these days.  A good pupil must be open to new ideas and new ways to achieve the same goals. This means not becoming defensive when a new idea is proposed that challenges  the “usual” way of doing things. Fresh thoughts might be game changing in a given situation. So, be open to new knowledge and listen to your fellow nurses.  They may have experiences in which you have not shared.  Learning is a never ending delight of life.  Be the object that the “point of light” shines on!!! Laura B. Duhamel, RN BSN, CLNC is a legal nurse consultant with MKC Medical Management. You may contact her at lbdlegalnurseconsultant@outlook.com...

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